Safety Hazards To Keep An Eye Out For In Construction Sites


Construction sites have a lot of potential hazards. So much so that some can get past even after a lot of scrutinies. But, even so, that shouldn’t be a reason why employers neglect their duties and stop looking out for their employees.

Below is a list of some of the most common hazards in constructions, and what kind of construction safety measures can be implemented to help prevent them in the future.

1. Falls

Falls from heights, account for as much as a third of all industry-related deaths, although, depending on who you ask or what studies you pull up, the numbers could be a whole lot more.

From falling from ridiculously tall heights, or even something as seemingly simple as falling off a ladder, falls are fairly common. Unfortunately, some can be fatal, especially if someone ends up landing in the wrong position, like on their head or neck.

A surefire way to minimize falls is to make sure that all work surfaces are stable and all equipment, especially ladders and scaffolding, meet safety regulations, are checked regularly for any damages and are used only for the right purposes. Or to put it simply, just do not overload them.

2. Electrical Hazards

Also, one of the most common (not to mention, most neglected) hazards in construction sites is electrical hazards.

Luckily, the majority of electrical hazards and hazards are preventable. For starters, making sure that workers are using the proper equipment when dealing with electrical wiring is key to minimizing accidents. Double checking everything is also a great way to make sure everything is safe and sound.

For better safety knowledge, having your construction training focused on electrical hazards might be necessary.

3. Hazardous materials

Construction sites are full of hazardous materials that could put everyone in the vicinity at potential risk if mishandled properly.

The proper handling and storage of hazardous materials should be an integral part of construction training. It’s important that employees know the dangers of the materials that they’re working with and know what to do to minimize the chances of putting themselves in harm’s way. More importantly, they should be wearing the necessary safety equipment if in case they’re required to handle such hazardous materials.

4. Collapses

Collapses in construction sites are so common that some have resorted to calling them as an occupational hazard. Although there is some truth to that statement, collapses are also preventable. Or, at the very least, you can minimize their occurrence.

Minimizing unintended collapses is possible by applying every possible precaution necessary (and possibly, even more) before starting work. Scaffoldings, for example, should be double checked, and anything that holds something particularly heavy should be checked for any loose bolts or nuts.

Employee protection starts at the top. Providing the necessary construction training is just a small step, knowing all these hazards is another. It’s important to constantly educate yourself on what it takes to improve the safety standards of your construction site and making sure that you establish a safety-first culture for your company.

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